An Ultimate Guide to Leveraging “EXCLUSIVITY” and “PRESTIGE” for Attracting High-Paying Attendants to Your Conferences, Seminars, and Trainings

 

 

How do people feel when they just bought a new Apple product?

 

They literally feel important and on top of the world.

 

It’s not as if Apple’s software can give them all what anyone could want in a device…

 

…but that’s just what and how Apple wants them to look and feel.

 

Why do you pay more for a drink you’re buying in a top class restaurant than what you can easily get at a roadside shop?

 

That same feeling of importance…that you’re buying at a place not everyone could buy from.

 

It gives you glory to show and tell anyone you just bought a new Gucci product…at a high and exorbitant price…

 

…even when you can easily get a locally made product, which could even be more durable, and at a huge fraction of the price of the Gucci material you bought…

 

But you’re well happy and fully satisfied with the Gucci product…no matter how costly you’ve bought it…just simply because it gives you a feeling of “exclusivity” and “prestige”…

 

…and goes on to make you highly “different” from every other person, and even more “important” than other people.

 

This “feeling of importance”, being “better than other people”, “exclusivity”, and “prestige” is a psychological state of mind that most, if not, all people crave for.

 

And when you put this into play in marketing your products and services to your leads and prospects…you’re bound to get insanely crazy conversions and positive results from your marketing.

 

 

A Live Illustration?

 

 

Now let me show you a live example of how you can take advantage of these psychological states of mind in your marketing…

 

Benjamin Hart (whom I learned this marketing tactic I’m showing you here from) is a member of a public policy organization called the “Council for National Policy”.

 

This Council meets three times a year in nice locations around the country of United States of America like Boca Raton, Aspen, Laguna Beach, places like that.

 

The purpose of the organization is to connect successful business leaders with right-of-center public policy organizations and candidates.

 

The goal is to interest these business leaders and wealthy individuals in politics and public policy and to get them contributing money to these non-profit public policy organizations, as well as mostly Republican candidates.

 

The only way you can join this organization is to be nominated first by another member.

 

You then have the privilege of paying a $2,500 (approx. #1,000,000) membership fee every year, plus the fee for attending the three meetings.

 

At these meetings, you might hear from the President or Vice President of the United States, the Speaker of the House, the Senate Majority Leader, and many other political leaders and luminaries.

 

The “attraction” of membership in the Council is…you will have plenty of opportunity to meet with and talk with Republican Party leaders and other influential people.

 

The Council is marketed as an “exclusive” organization.

 

It’s considered an “honour” to be invited to join.

 

Was it really an “honour”?

 

But that’s how it’s sold.

 

And the only way you can get in is with a referral from another member.

 

You will then receive a letter announcing that you have been nominated for membership in the Council by “so and so”.

 

You can literally deploy this strategy effectively for all kinds of organizations, associations, conferences, seminars, trainings, and so forth.

 

 

Another Close Example?

 

 

Another great example is found with a client of Benjamin Hart who is a creator of educational programs for high-achieving young people.

 

The way they find students for the courses is to write teachers and ask them to nominate six of their best students to participate in the prestigious “National Young Leaders Conference”.

 

The nominations come in from the teachers.

 

The names and addresses of the student nominees are entered into a computer database.

 

The nominees then receive a letter that begins something like this:

 

 

Congratulations!

 

I am pleased to announce that you have been nominated to be a National Scholar and Delegate to ……………… in Washington, D. C., this fall (season).

 

Your teacher, [Name], identified you as one of her most outstanding students.

 

The Nominations Committee then examined your academic record and concluded that you qualify for nomination.

 

You should feel proud of your exemplary academic record and your selection to be a National Scholar representing the State of Virginia.

 

 

This letter is then sent out in an impressive-looking invitation holder and package.

 

It as well includes a program schedule, an impressive list of advisors, and even a short form letter from the country’s President (or any other worthy personality) welcoming the students, and an Enrollment Application.

 

Another letter is sent to the parents at the same time.

 

The tuition for the five-day conference is about $1,400 (approx. #560,000). 

 

The point to note here is…this list of participants is developed by way of a “referral” strategy.

 

The students are found by asking teachers to provide names of (nominate) their best students.

 

This is how the prospects (invitation) list is built.

 

When this kind of letter arrives, it has instant credibility because the teacher’s name is mentioned right away.

 

If the child’s teacher is involved in this program, then it must be worthwhile.

 

This will be a very powerful evidence for the parent of the value of the program.

 

This potent system mixes the use of the “referral” strategy with the appealing to the desire for “exclusivity” and “prestige” present in every human’s mind.

 

Use this ultimate system with your next conferences, seminars, or trainings…and see how people rush to pay you huge prices just to show they’re in some exclusive clubs not everyone could ever be privileged to be in!

 

Try it.

 

 

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